Y C Logo2Who are young carers?

The Care Act 2014 defines a young carer as, ‘a person under 18 who provides care for another person of any age who may be physically or mentally ill, elderly, frail, disabled or who misuses alcohol or other substances’.

We estimate that there are between 4,000 – 5,000 young carers in Sefton supporting a parent, sibling, or other family member or neighbour who could not manage without that support.

Our service model explains how Sefton Carers Centre is working with local schools, colleges and other partners to identify, assess and support young carers across the Borough.

Click here for a copy of our service model.


Making a referral

If you wish to make a referral to the service please complete our referral form and return it. One of our Young Carers Support Workers will then contact you to discuss the referral.

We also use assessment tools to help us to better understand what practical support a young carer is providing as well as how they feel about it. These assessment tools are called MACA (Multi-dimensional Assessment of Caring Activities) and PANOC (Positive and Negative Outcomes of Caring. These assessments are quick and easy to complete using a simple tick box system. The forms are available on one document on the link below with a description of how score the answers.

If you are not sure that a referral is appropriate at this stage, then please contact one of the team before you submit it on 0151 288 6060.

Click here for a copy of our referral form.


What do young carers do?

Young carers are doing much more than simple chores, such as keeping their bedrooms tidy or going to the shops. They will be caring for someone in the household with a long-term health, condition or a physical disability. They may be caring for a brother or sister who may have a physical or learning disability or a behavioural problem.

In our experience the responsibilities undertaken by young carers frequently fall into one or more of the following six categories.

Domestic activity

The extent to which the young person engages in activities such as cleaning, cooking, laundry etc.

Household management

The extent to which the young person engages in activities to keep the household running such as shopping, household repairs, garden maintenance etc.

Financial and practical management

The extent to which the young person helps to manage household finances such as bill paying, dealing with benefits, banking or takes on adult responsibilities such as working part-time to contribute to household finances.

Personal care 

The extent to which the young person engages in caring activities such as helping the person to dress and undress, wash and use the bathroom, help with mobility, and giving health care such as administering medicine and changing dressings etc.

Emotional care 

The extent to which the young person provides company and emotional support to the person, keeping an eye on them, providing supervision and taking them out etc.

Sibling care 

The extent to which the young person is responsible for looking after siblings either alone or with a parent present.


What kind of support do they need?

Many young carers simply don’t recognise themselves as being a carer. They often don’t realise that they might be doing something exceptional or different from their peers, but when we ask them what it is they need they often tell us that they want to:

Have more free time’, ‘Support to enable them to do things with their friends’, ‘Improve their school attendance’, Help to do their best’, ‘Be listened to and understood’, ‘Be included in decisions that affect their lives’


Our Service Charter

We want young carers to help us to shape the service we deliver. This is why we have met with young carers and have asked them what our service should offer.

These discussions resulted in the creation of our Service Charter. Because the Charter was designed by young carers themselves we regard it as our contract with them.

Click Here for a copy of the Charter